Smartphone Spectrometry

The ubiquitous smartphone contains millions of times more computing power than was used to send the Apollo spacecraft to the moon. Increasingly, scientists are repurposing some of that processing power to create low-cost, convenient scientific instruments. In doing so, these measurements are edging closer to being feasible for citizen scientists and under-funded professionals, democratizing robust scientific observations. In our new paper in the journal ‘Sensors’, led by Andrew McGonigle (University of Sheffield) we review the development of smartphone spectrometery.

smartphone
Created by Natanaelginting – Freepik.com
Abstract: McGonigle et al. 2018: Smartphone Spectrometers

Smartphones are playing an increasing role in the sciences, owing to the ubiquitous proliferation of these devices, their relatively low cost, increasing processing power and their suitability for integrated data acquisition and processing in a ‘lab in a phone’ capacity. There is furthermore the potential to deploy these units as nodes within Internet of Things architectures, enabling massive networked data capture. Hitherto, considerable attention has been focused on imaging applications of these devices. However, within just the last few years, another possibility has emerged: to use smartphones as a means of capturing spectra, mostly by coupling various classes of fore-optics to these units with data capture achieved using the smartphone camera. These highly novel approaches have the potential to become widely adopted across a broad range of scientific e.g., biomedical, chemical and agricultural application areas. In this review, we detail the exciting recent development of smartphone spectrometer hardware, in addition to covering applications to which these units have been deployed, hitherto. The paper also points forward to the potentially highly influential impacts that such units could have on the sciences in the coming decades

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